Network+ Connector Types

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If you’re preparing for the Network+ N10-005 exam, you may want to try a couple of practice test questions related to connector types. The Network Media and Topologies domain makes up 17% of the exam so you can expect 17 questions in this category. For example, you may see something similar to the following Network+ practice test question.

Network+ Practice Test Question

Q. Of the following choices, what is used for fiber and is connected using a push and twist action?

A. Coaxial
B. F-connector
C. ST
D. SC

Answer provided at end.

Realistic practice test questions for the Network+ N10-005 exam
CompTIA Network+ N10-005 Practice Test Questions (Get Certified Get Ahead)
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In order to answer the question correctly, you first need to know what is used for fiber. They are listed here with links to Google images if you want to see some pictures.

Coaxial is a type of cable and an F-connector is a twist-on type used with coaxial so you can throw the first two answers out right away.

Now the only thing you need to figure out is which fiber connection is a twist-on type – the straight tip (ST) or the square connector (SC). Well, if you know anything about squares, you probably know they don’t twist very well so it must be the straight tip.

Practice Test Question

Here’s another one you can try.

Q. You need to plug a fiber optic cable in to an RJ-45 jack. What, if anything, can you use?

A. Nothing. This is not possible.
B. Media converter
C. ST connector
D. SC connector

Answer at end.

If you know basics about cables and connectors, you can throw out answers C and D right away. An RJ-45 jack is used with twisted pair cable. The ST and SC connectors are used with fiber and you can’t plug them directly into the RJ-45 jack.

However, media converters were created specifically for situations just like this. The objectives specifically mention gigabit interface converters (GBICs) which are used to convert copper and fiber connections.

Realistic practice test questions for the Network+ N10-005 exam
Available through LearnZapp on your mobile phone

Basics

Here are some basic notes on connections that are worth remembering for the exam.

Fiber Connections

  • ST – connects with a push and twist-on action
  • SC – a snap-on connection
  • LC – a snap-on connection
  • MTRJ – a snap-on connection

Copper Connections

  • RJ-45 – used with twisted pair cable on a network
  • RJ-11 – used with twisted pair cable for telephones
  • BNC – a push and twist connection used with coaxial
  • F-connector – a twist-on connection used with RG-6 coaxial
  • DB-9 – A 9-pin D shaped connection used for serial connections such as RS-232
  • 110 block – A termination point for twisted pair cables (replacing the 66 block)
Realistic practice test questions for the Network+ N10-005 exam
Available through LearnZapp on your mobile phone

Answer

Q. Of the following choices, what is used for fiber and is connected using a push and twist action?

A. Coaxial
B. F-connector
C. ST
D. SC

Answer: C is correct. A straight tip (ST) connector connects with a push and twist-on action and is used with fiber cable.

A is incorrect. Coaxial is a type of cable. It uses a Bayonet Neill-Concelman (BNC) connection with a push and twist action but it is used for copper, not fiber.

B is incorrect. An F-connector is used with copper RG-6 cables.

D is incorrect. A square connector (SC) is used with fiber, but you can’t twist the square connection after pushing it on. It is often used with a gigabit interface converter (GBIC) converting a copper connection (such as RJ-45) to fiber.

Objective: 3.2 Categorize standard connector types based on network media.


These practice test questions are from the CompTIA Network+ N10-005 Practice Test Questions (Get Certified Get Ahead) ebook. It includes over 275 realistic practice test questions and is available as a Kindle ebook for only $9.99. You can download free Kindle apps from Amazon so that you can access the ebook from just about any platform including:

  • Windows PC
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  • iPhone
  • iPad
  • Android
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  • Windows Phone 7

Over 275 realistic practice test questions with in-depth explanations. The Kindle version also includes 175 flash cards to reinforce key testable topics.

You may also like to check out these Network+ blogs:


Answer

Q. You need to plug in a fiber optic cable to an RJ-45 jack. What, if anything, can be used to allow this to work?

A. Nothing. This is not possible.
B. Media converter
C. ST connector
D. SC connector

Answer: B is correct. A media converter is used to connect dissimilar media and connectors. There are media converters that will connect
fiber optic cable to an RJ-45 jack. Media converters are sometimes called transceivers because they can transmit and receive data.

A is incorrect. It is possible to achieve this with a media converter.

C is incorrect. A straight tip (ST) connector is used to connect a fiber cable to a fiber jack with a push and twist-on connection.

D is incorrect. A square connector (SC) is used to connect a fiber cable to a fiber jack. It is sometimes called subscriber or standard connector.

Objective: 3.1 Categorize standard media types and associated properties.

Summary

I hope this information helps you nail any connector-type questions you get on the Network+ exam.

Here are some links to more  resources to help you pass the Network+ exam the first time you take it.

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