Active VS Passive IDS Responses

Posted by in Security+ | 0 comments

An IDS can only detect an attack. It will respond after detecting an attack, and IDS responses can be either passive or active. If you’re planning to take the Security+ exam, you should have a basic understanding of appropriate tools and techniques to discover security threats and vulnerabilities.

For example, can you answer this question?

Q. A security company wants to gather intelligence about current methods attackers are using against its clients. What can it use?

A. Vulnerability scan

B. Honeynet

C. MAC address filtering

D. Evil twin

More, do you know why the correct answer is correct and the incorrect answers are incorrect? The answer and explanation is available at the end of this post.

Get Certified Get Ahead

IDS Responses

An IDS will respond after detecting an attack, and the response can be either passive or active. A passive response primarily consists of logging and notifying personnel, whereas an active response also changes the environment to block the attack:

  • Passive IDS. A passive IDS logs the attack and may also raise an alert to notify someone. Most IDSs are passive by default. The notification can come in many forms, including an email, a text message, a pop-up window, or a notification on a central monitor.
  • Active IDS. An active IDS logs and notifies personnel just as a passive IDS does, but it can also change the environment to thwart or block the attack. For example, it can modify access control lists (ACLs) on firewalls to block offending traffic, close processes on a system that were caused by the attack, or divert the attack to a safe environment, such as a honeynet or honeypot.

Active VS Passive IDS Responses

Remember this

Honeypots and honeynets attempt to divert attackers from live networks. They give security personnel an opportunity to observe current methodologies used in attacks, and gather intelligence on these attacks.

CompTIA Security+ Study Guide (SY0-401)

The 401 Version of the Study Guide is Now Available

SY0-401 Study GuideThe CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide is an update to the top-selling SY0-201 and SY0-301 study guides, which have helped thousands of readers pass the exam the first time they took it.

CompTIA Authorized Quality Content (CAQC)After a comprehensive review by ProCert Labs, the SY0-401 version has been certified as CompTIA Approved Quality Content (CAQC) and covers every aspect of the SY0-401 exam.

It includes the same elements readers raved about in the previous two versions.

Each of the eleven chapters presents topics in an easy to understand manner and includes real-world examples of security principles in action.

You’ll understand the important and relevant security topics for the Security+ exam, without being overloaded with unnecessary details. Additionally, each chapter includes a comprehensive review section to help you focus on what’s important.


Click for Free Preview


Over 400 realistic practice test questions with in-depth explanations will help you test your comprehension and readiness for the exam. The book includes:

  • A 100 question pre-test
  • A 100 question post-test
  • Practice test questions at the end of every chapter.

Each practice test question includes a detailed explanation to help you understand the content and the reasoning behind the question. You’ll be ready to take and pass the exam the first time you take it.

If you plan to pursue any of the advanced security certifications, this guide will also help you lay a solid foundation of security knowledge. Learn this material, and you’ll be a step ahead for other exams. This SY0-401 study guide is for any IT or security professional interested in advancing in their field, and a must read for anyone striving to master the basics of IT security.

Kindle edition also available.

Counterattacks

An active response IDS would rarely perform a counterattack against the attacker. Some network security professionals specialize in attacks or counterattacks, but regular administrators should avoid them.

Consider basic human nature. If one person bumps into another in a crowd, the second person could simply ignore it or give a smile and a nod indicating “no problem,” and the event is over. On the other hand, if the response is an aggressive push accompanied by some loud words, the event escalates. It can turn ugly quickly. Now, compare this to some basic facts about attackers today:

  • Attackers are dedicated. Attackers aren’t just bored teenagers passing their time away like Matthew Broderick in the movie War Games. Most attackers today are dedicated criminals working in a semiskilled profession. This is similar to a seasoned car thief with specific skills to break into and steal cars. They are often very good at what they do. Attackers’ skills steadily increase, and their tools are becoming more and more sophisticated.
  • Attackers have unlimited time. Attackers usually have the luxury of spending 100 percent of their time on attack strategies and methodologies. Compare this with network administrators, who have a host of other duties and rarely can spend 100 percent of their time on security.

Many administrators certainly have the expertise to investigate an attack, trace an IP address back, and launch a counterattack. However, just because you can doesn’t mean you should. The attacker will likely detect the counterattack and escalate the attack. Instead of moving on from your network, the attacker might take your attack personally and consider it a lifelong mission to cripple your network.

It’s also highly likely that the attacking IP address is not the actual attacker. Very often, attackers hijack the machines of unwitting users and launch attacks from their systems. If you counterattack, you could be attacking the wrong computer.


Full Security+ Course

Full Security+ Course Now Available

Helping you Pass the First Time

Online access includes all of the content from the

CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide

  • Introduction
  • About the exam (including types of questions and strategies for performance-based questions)
  • 100 question pre-assessment exam
  • Mastering Security Basics (full content from Chapter 1 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Exploring Control Types and Methods (full content from Chapter 2 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Understanding Basic Network Security (full content from Chapter 3 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Securing Your Network (full content from Chapter 4 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Securing Hosts and Data (full content from Chapter 5 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Understanding Malware and Social Engineering (full content from Chapter 6 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Identifying Advanced Attacks (full content from Chapter 7 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Managing Risk (full content from Chapter 8 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Preparing for Business Continuity (full content from Chapter 9 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Understanding Cryptography (full content from Chapter 10 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • Exploring Operational Security (full content from Chapter 11 of the study guide including the exam topic review and 20 practice test questions)
  • 100 question post-assessment exam
  • Security+ Acronyms

Get the Full Security+ Course Here

 Full Security+ Course Now Available


Test your readiness with these quality materials

Random 100-question tests

Random practice tests from the all of the practice test questions in the CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide. All questions include explanations so you'll know why the correct answers are correct, and why the incorrect answers are incorrect.

34 Simulated Performance-based Questions

Eight sets of performance-based questions with multiple questions in each set. These questions help you understand and prepare for performance based questions.

22 Realistic Performance-based Questions

Two new sets of performance-based questions with a total of 22 questions. These new questions use a new testing engine that includes realistic drag and drop, matching, sorting, and fill in the blank questions.

Flashcard Set

  • 273 Security+ Flashcards to reinforce key testable concepts
  • 280 Security+ acronyms flashcards to help you master the required acronyms
  • 204 Security+ Remember This slides

Audio - SY0-401 Security+ Remember This Audio Files

Learn by Listening. Over one hour and 15 minutes of audio (MP3 downloads.)

Audio - SY0-401 Security+ Question and Answer Audio Files

Learn by Listening. Over three hours hour and 15 minutes of audio (MP3 downloads.)

Bonus #1

Audio from the end of chapter reviews from each of the chapters in the CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide. Over one hour and 15 minutes of additional audio.

Bonus #2

Subnetting mini-tutorial that will help you answer two key question types:
  • Identify how many hosts a subnet supports
  • Identify valid IP addresses within a subnet

Bonus #3 

Access the study materials for a total of 60 days because sometimes life happens.

Get the Full Security+ Course Here

Q. A security company wants to gather intelligence about current methods attackers are using against its clients. What can it use?

A. Vulnerability scan

B. Honeynet

C. MAC address filtering

D. Evil twin

Answer is B. A honeynet is a fake network designed to look valuable to attackers and can help security personnel learn about current attack methods. In this scenario, the security company can install honeynets in its customers’ networks to lure the attackers.

A vulnerability scan detects vulnerabilities, but attackers may not try to exploit them.

Media access control (MAC) address filtering is a form of network access control, but can’t be used to detect or learn about attacks.

An evil twin is a rogue access point with the same SSID as an authorized access point.

See Chapter 4 of the CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide for more information securing network.

Leave a Comment

CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Join our mailing list and get a free excerpt of the CompTIA Security+: Get Certified Get Ahead: SY0-401 Study Guide.  This excerpt includes the introduction and Chapter 1. 

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Get Certified Get Ahead is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program,
an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.

Copyright © 2015 Get Certified Get Ahead. All Rights Reserved.